Description

The Triumph TR6 (1968–76) is a sports car built by British Triumph Motor Company between 1968 and 1976. It was the best-seller of the TR range when production ended, a record subsequently surpassed by the TR7. There are 91,850 TR6s produced.

The bodywork was generally similar to the TR4/TR5, but the front and back ends were squared off, reportedly as a result of a consultancy contract involving Karmann. All TR6s were powered by Triumph’s 2.5-litre straight-6, with the same Lucas mechanical fuel-injection as the TR5 for the United Kingdom and global markets, and carburetted for the United States, as had been the US-only TR250. The TR6PI (petrol-injection) system helped the home-market TR6 produce 150 bhp (110 kW) (152 hp DIN) at model introduction. The TR6 featured a four-speed manual transmission. An optional electrically switched overdrive operated on second, third, and fourth gears on early models and third and fourth on later ones. Construction was traditional frame. Other features included semi-trailing arm independent rear suspension, rack and pinion steering, 15-inch (380 mm) wheels and Michelin asymmetric XAS tyres which dramatically improved the handling, pile carpet on floors and trunk/boot, bucket seats, and full instrumentation. Brakes were discs at the front and drums at the rear. A factory steel hardtop was optional, requiring two people to deploy. The dashboard was walnut veneer. Other factory options included a rear anti-roll bar and a limited-slip differential.

This specific car was my fathers. He chased the TR6 in the early eighties, transported the car to his home stored it in the shed and never drove a mile with it. Around 2000 he desided to buy a Lotus, so the TR6 had to go. And guess who bought it … that’s right, me. And by the way, we also have the original hardtop.